How To Appeal A Speeding Fine

It may come as a surprise to obtain a Notification of Planned Action (NIP) in the post, particularly if you had no idea you’d been caught speeding. It may be the case that the speeding ticket was given in error; either you were not driving at the moment or the police used the inaccurate description on the record. When that is the case then an appeal against the penalty is worth exploring. While most speeding-fine appeals are successful, there are some risks to look out for which may mean the difference between winning the appeal against and losing a speeding fine.Have a look at additional hints for more info on this.

Any speeding-fine challenges will be taken on the speeding ticket within 28 days of the event. When you seek to appeal beyond this deadline, the petition is likely to be rejected completely and you’ll have to pay the penalty. Claiming negligence is therefore unlikely to support the case; as a rider, understanding the speed limits on the roads you are driving on is the duty. When you believe the speed limit has not been specifically signposted, this is another matter because in this situation you would require evidence of your claim.

Probably the most difficult argument to make in an appeal for a speeding penalty is who drived at the moment the speeding fine was given. There is visual proof of speed cameras although that is usually very unhelpful when attempting to locate a car. It is not a smart choice to claim not to realize who the defendant was when the summons was imposed because you might wind up getting a £ 1,000 fee and up to six penalty points on your license. Ultimately , the best way to appeal for a speeding ticket is to do so truthfully; give all the information as accurately as possible and, if you were unfairly issued a speeding fine, you might have a good chance of winning the appeal.