Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression Therapy

Manual clinical stimulation, administered to spinal vertebral joints to treat recurrent backache, sciatica and other musculoskeletal conditions affecting the spinal cord, is non-surgical spinal decompression. The spinal joints are weakened due to age-related degenerative bone disorders or some occupational behaviours that trigger undue wear and tear of the axial spine, contributing to herniation, nerve compression, stenosis and arthritis, which impact the quality of life and can interfere with day-to-day behaviours. Chiropractors conduct manual stretching of the vertebral joints to ease strain, discomfort and pain from the nerves, muscles and tendons in order to control the debilitating effects.Learn more by visiting Spinal Decompression Los Angeles

Non-surgical or surgical spinal decompression therapy’s main purpose is to extend the spinal vertebral joints without inducing spinal muscle contraction. A negative suction force (or intra-discal pressure) is created mainly to pull the prolapsed ends of the disc inwards and thereby to help alleviate symptoms.

Your chiropractor may conduct 20 to 28 therapy sessions over a duration of approximately 5 to 8 weeks, depending on the diagnosis, seriousness of the lesion and other related factors. Each session can last for about 30 to 45 minutes on a spinal decompression table (that has adjustable length and segmentation) during which you lie. Your therapist changes the table according to the position and nature of the injuries (which can be computer-operated or manual).

Other supportive therapies may be required during therapy to potentiate the impact of decompression such as heat compresses or cold compresses to relieve pain effects (as a consequence of therapeutic decompression or because of the therapy itself), ultrasound waves therapy to offer warmth to inflamed tissues with greater penetration and promote cellular regeneration and healing or transcompression.

A case series in which non-surgical spinal decompression was attempted in 778 cases with a history of disc dysfunction, facet syndrome or persistent low back pain was documented in a research performed by the Gose author. With intermittent decompression, 71 per cent of the sample population received pain reduction and increase in movement without any extra treatment. Subjective pain compensation of 0 or 1 on a scale of 0 to 5 was the optimistic outcome.

For people who develop recurrent worsening symptoms due to degenerative disease of the vertebral joints progressing to spinal stenosis, non-surgical spinal decompression is suggested, defined by constant and severe lower back pain that inhibits physical mobility, progressive degenerative joint disease accompanied by complications such as bladder incontinence, bowel incontinence

According to the Steven J Atlas report, as opposed to non-surgical decompression, surgical decompression has a marginally improved long-term prognosis, but the incidence of short-term complications in surgical patients is higher. Atlas indicated that in mild to severe situations, a non-surgical solution should be used, although if symptoms do not improve, surgical decompression should be attempted.

Non-surgical spinal decompression produces a harmful pressure condition that facilitates spinal vertebrae retraction that aims to fix herniated discs and intervertebral compressed joints. Researchers conclude that without undertaking decompression, it is difficult to repair intervertebral stress fractures. The most excellent feature of decompression is the regeneration of blood flow to tissues that heal and the avoidance of nerve injury sustained by strain.